Scipio S right Erotica by Nick Scipio

Frequently Asked Questions

When will you post the next chapter?

Can you post more often? Or more than one chapter at a time?

If you’re working on Chapter x, but you just posted Chapter t, why don’t you post Chapters u, v, and w?

Can I read in-progress chapters?

What about fan fiction? I want to write a Summer Camp story.

Who died? Who is Paul’s wife? Have you decided yet?

How many Summer Camp books are you going to write?

Will you ever write more Jazz Club stories? What about Mike Logan (“Lara”) and Hank Adair (“Breakdown”)?

Are you a professional writer?

Can I buy a printed copy of Summer Camp?

Why don’t you have images of mature women?

I spotted a typo.

Would you mind some constructive criticism?

Dived? Don’t you mean dove?

Susan wouldn’t have to worry about hiding her shaved pubic area. You see that all the time.

I sent you e-mail/feedback, but you never replied.

How do you pronounce your last name?

Wasn’t Scipio some Roman guy?

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Q: When will you post the next chapter?

A: When it’s ready.

I used to post on a regular schedule, but that led to two problems: 1) I got burned out, and 2) a small but thoroughly obnoxious group of readers developed a sense of entitlement. So I post whenever I can now.

Please don’t ask when I’ll post the next chapter. I won’t tell you. If you want to know the instant I do, sign up for my mailing list. It’s free, spam-free, and completely confidential (I won’t sell, rent, trade, share, or give away your e-mail address).

Last but not least, do not bitch about my posting schedule. Don’t remind me of the date, or how long it’s been since I posted the last chapter. Don’t tell me how long it’ll take to finish the story at the current rate. Don’t say you want to read the end before you die. Don’t complain that you have to re-read the previous chapter to catch up again. Don’t drop hints that it sure would be nice to read the next chapter, wink, wink. In short, don’t be an obnoxious reader with a sense of entitlement.

Why? Because I have no tolerance for people who feel entitled to something I do for free. Worse, I have a hair-trigger when it comes to passive-aggressive behavior (everything in the previous paragraph is classic P-A bullshit). If you piss me off, you’re likely to receive a flaming reply and a permanent position in my kill-filter. I don’t suffer fools lightly—or quietly—even if you’re “just kidding.” No, I take that back… especially if you’re “just kidding.”

Remember, I write for free, and I don’t owe you a thing. So please, keep your snarky comments and bad attitude to yourself. Just remove my site from your bookmarks—I won’t even notice, I promise—and go read something else.

For everyone else (the other 99.9%), thanks for being patient, and thanks for reading. I definitely appreciate both.

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Q: Can you post more often? Or more than one chapter at a time?

A: No, sorry. Writing is an asymmetric process: you might be able to read a chapter in an hour, but it takes more than 30 hours to write it in the first place. Let me take you inside the process…

I can write about 1,000 words an hour, but I rarely have large blocks of time to write, and I’m happy if I can average 1,000 words a day. So a chapter of Summer Camp is 15-20 hours of writing, spread over days or even weeks. During that time, I spend an additional 8-10 hours plotting, rewriting, and editing.

When a chapter is ready for a reality check, I send it off to my team. This is usually a multi-round process, and can add 6-8 hours of work. Once a chapter is finally up to my publishing standard, I send it off to my editor. When it comes back, I review and make changes, which can take several hours. Then I send it to my proofreaders, who return a list of corrections. I do another proofreading pass of my own, which adds a couple of hours. Finally, I create the HTML and text versions for the web site, which takes an hour or so.

So, by the time you read each chapter, I’ve spent weeks creating it, and the people on my team have put in plenty of hours reviewing it. Writing is fun, but it’s also work. We do this work for free. It’s very flattering that you want more—faster and sooner—but Summer Camp isn’t supposed to be a second job.

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Q: If you’re working on Chapter x, but you just posted Chapter t, why don’t you post Chapters u, v, and w?

A: I need to have several chapters waiting for publication. First, it makes my life easier, since I’m not rushing to stay one step ahead of my posting schedule. (I’ve done that before, and it’s not worth it.) Second, a multiple-chapter buffer allows me to go back and revise unpublished chapters if I need to.

I know you want to read everything as soon as you can, but the buffer is for my own sanity. I’m sure you’ll survive until I release the next chapter. I appreciate your enthusiasm, though.

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Q: Can I read in-progress chapters?

A: No, but thanks for asking. My team and I put a lot of effort into editing and proofreading. We hope it shows.

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Q: What about fan fiction? I want to write a Summer Camp story.

A: Go for it! I’ll be happy to help with background and plot details.

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Q: Who died? Who is Paul’s wife? Have you decided yet?

A: I’ve known since I began writing the story, way back in August 2002. By the end of Book 4, you’ll know who Paul’s wife is going to be, and the Epilogue for the entire story will deal with the funeral and its aftermath.

Will I tell you before then? No, sorry. Even if you ask nicely? No, but thanks for being polite.

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Q: How many Summer Camp books are you going to write?

A: Four, although I’ll probably write a few Summer Camp short stories, too. We’ll see how much energy I have when I finish the four main books.

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Q: Will you ever write more Jazz Club stories? What about Mike Logan (“Lara”) and Hank Adair (“Breakdown”)?

A: I’ll write more eventually. I have more stories in my head, for all three universes. But let me finish Summer Camp first, and then take a well-deserved break. Maybe I’ll write a mainstream novel. I also have plenty of other story ideas. But I’ll come back to the Jazz Club and the others. Eventually.

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Q: Are you a professional writer?

A: The short answer is yes… and no. Yes, I occasionally get paid for stories, and I approach writing like any other professional writer (with lots of planning, research, and attention to detail). I also have a dedicated team of volunteers who help with everything. But no, I’m not a full-time professional writer. I’ll get there sooner or later, though, and you’ll be able to buy my books in print. In the meantime, you’ll have to settle for the free stories on the internet, but at least they come with a money-back guarantee. ;-)

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Q: Can I buy a printed copy of Summer Camp?

A: No, but thanks for asking. I’ve thought about publishing it, but I probably never will. Because of the holier-than-thou moral hypocrites in the US, no one will publish underage erotica. It’s legal to write it, but I still can’t publish it. That’s just a fact of life, and I don’t like it any more than you do.

Why not self-publish with a vanity publisher? I could, but then I’d have to deal with the legalities of selling it. It’s legal in the US, but what about other countries? I’m not a lawyer, and I don’t want to become one. Besides, I don’t need the hassle of some self-righteous district attorney who decides to stake his next election campaign on my hide. I may be a rebel, but I’m no Lenny Bruce. Sorry.

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Q: Why don’t you have images of mature women?

A: I haven’t found any good ones. There are dozens of sites with nude teens and twenty-something girls, but there aren’t many good sites with mature women. Trust me, I’ve looked. But feel free to contact me if you find a site that meets the following criteria:

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Q: I spotted a typo.

A: Please tell me about it. My team and I work very hard to eliminate typos, but I’m only human. I always appreciate a little friendly proofreading (and fact-checking). But please do me a favor: tell me about it as soon as you spot it. Stop reading and hit the Contact link at the bottom of the page. I can’t tell you how many e-mails I get that say, “Oh yeah, I spotted a typo, but I can’t remember where...”

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Q: Would you mind some constructive criticism?

A: Be my guest… as long as it’s constructive. But please remember, there’s a difference between offering suggestions for improvement and simply telling me what you didn’t like. I appreciate constructive criticism, no matter how sharp it is. I may agree with you, or I may not, but I’ll always thank you for your feedback. On the other hand, telling me what you didn’t like isn’t all that helpful—it’s just complaining, and will probably earn you a pithy reply.

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Q: Dived? Don’t you mean dove?

A: No, I mean dived. In my lexicon dove is a bird. The past tense of to dive is dived. Both dived and dove are correct, though. Dived is more common, but not by much. It’s also a regional difference. Merriam-Webster has a good usage note about it.

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Q: Susan wouldn’t have to worry about hiding her shaved pubic area. You see that all the time.

A: In a modern camp, sure. But from my personal, real-world experience, shaved pubic hair was very uncommon in the mid- to late-’70s. Trust me, I was there.

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Q: I sent you e-mail/feedback, but you never replied.

A: Well, I read all my e-mail, but I’m the world’s worst correspondent. Unfortunately, I have a limited number of hours I can devote to writing, and I can either respond to e-mail or write the stories themselves. I’m sorry I can’t answer e-mail as quickly as I’d like, but there simply aren’t enough hours in the day. I do reply to everything, though… eventually.

If you have questions about the stories, plots, characters, or anything else, you’ll probably find the answers here in the FAQ, in Nickipedia, or in my Forum. I respond to questions in the Forum quicker than e-mail, because the answers reach so many more people. So be sure to check out the Forum. (Is that enough links to the Forum? ;-)

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Q: How do you pronounce your last name?

A: Like Classical Latin: “skippy-o.”

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Q: Wasn’t Scipio some Roman guy?

A: Scipio Africanus Major was the Roman general who defeated Hannibal of Carthage (yes, the guy with the elephants) to end the Second Punic War, c.202 BC.

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